Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis

Study of a patient suffering from multiple sclerosis
This patient (born 1956) got his first dental filling at the age of nine. In his later employment as a welding-operator he was exposed to metal fumes. During the period 1974 to 1984 he had five root fillings inserted, all containing TMS-screws (made of non-precious metals prone to corrosion), one root filling with N2 (contains lead and phenyl mercury), and another one with amalgam. When multiple sclerosis was diagnosed in 1984, the patient suspected that his illness could have a connection with sensitivity toward metals. To select substances to test with MELISA, his dentist scraped some metal from his gold fillings. Following day, the patient became severely ill and unable to walk. The patient was treated with a metal chelator (which binds and removes metals from body) and immunosuppressive agents which “put him on his feet” again. The MELISA test proved that he was allergic to several metals
 

case-reports2

Evaluation of the test results: Positive response (allergy) to mercuric chloride, phenyl mercury, cadmium, nickel, titanium, cobalt, chromium, palladium. Negative to gold.
 
Following the removal of a root filled tooth, a striking improvement occurred. The patient did not need his crutch any more and called the laboratory with joy. However, at the next dental treatment the dentist tried to “clean” root filled front teeth in an attempt to save them. The following day the patient was again unable to walk